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Celestial Charts

Star Charts : 0743437705

Star Charts : 0743437705

IBCENTERall I ask is a tall ship, and a star to steer her by./CENTER/B/IPFrom the earliest days of explorations, there has always been one tried-and-true way to navigate through uncharted reaches and one to find the way home -- the stars. Ancient mariners prized their star charts, knowing that they could guide them safely into a friendly port or lead them to the reaches of the mysterious East. Modes of transportation have changes but the stars are still our constant. When man took his first step into space armed with the very latest in computers, he took with him the same tool for reading the stars that the men who sailed under canvas carried.PWhen humans launched the first ship designed for long-range missions into the deep waters of interstellar space, the Vulcan High Command provided their star charts for theIEnterprise/I™. But Jonathan Archer was not content with relying on the known. Although he used the Vulcan charts, he also added to them, and greatly expanded Starfleet's knowledge of the galaxy. Every generation of starship captain that followed has built on Archer's first steps.PFollow the course set by Archer, Kirk, Picard, Sisko, and Janeway. Relive their extraordinary adventures as you find here, for the first time, the star maps that chart the routes these famous explorers took.



The Observer's Sky Atlas: With 50 Star Charts Covering The Entire Sky

The Observer's Sky Atlas: With 50 Star Charts Covering The Entire Sky

The Observer's Sky Atlas: With 50 Star Charts Covering The Entire Sky



Star Trek Star Charts

"all I ask is a tall ship, and a star to steer her by."From the earliest days of explorations, there has always been one tried-and-true way to navigate through uncharted reaches and one to find the way home -- the stars. Ancient mariners prized their star charts, knowing that they could guide them safely into a friendly port or lead them to the reaches of the mysterious East. Modes of transportation have changes but the stars are still our constant. When man took his first step into space armed with the very latest in computers, he took with him the same tool for reading the stars that the men who sailed under canvas carried. When humans launched the first ship designed for long-range missions into the deep waters of interstellar space, the Vulcan High Command provided their star charts for the Enterprise™. But Jonathan Archer was not content with relying on the known. Although he used the Vulcan charts, he also added to them, and greatly expanded Starfleet's knowledge of the galaxy. Every generation of starship captain that followed has built on Archer's first steps.Follow the course set by Archer, Kirk, Picard, Sisko, and Janeway. Relive their extraordinary adventures as you find here, for the first time, the star maps that chart the routes these famous explorers took.



Skywatchers 2010 Wall Calendar

Skywatchers 2010 Wall Calendar

"Skywatchers Wall Calendar: On a starry night, the sky is the ultimate time machine, full of light generated eons ago. Learn what prehistoric events produced the stars, nebulae, pulsars, and quasars we view today. Read daily notes on constellations, scientist's theories about the universe, and starwatching hints. View stars with or without binoculars. Vivid color sky charts, timely data, and insightful articles alert you to planetary conjunctions, meteor showers, lunar and solar eclipses, and much more. The star maps in this calendar are year-round reference charts for people living in Canada, U.S. cities from Washington D.C. to San Francisco and points north, and most of Europe. This sky charts calendar will come in handy when you are gazing at the night sky. "



Star Maps For Beginners

Star Maps For Beginners

Star Maps For Beginners



A New Star Atlas for the Library, the School, and the Observatory in Twelve Circular Maps

A New Star Atlas for the Library, the School, and the Observatory in Twelve Circular Maps

Title: A New Star Atlas for the Library, the School, and the Observatory in Twelve Circular Maps: Intended as a Companion to ''webb''s Cellestial Objects for Common Telescopes'' Publisher: London: Longmans, Green Publication date: 1881 Subjects: Stars Notes: This is an OCR reprint. There may be typos or missing text. There are no illustrations or indexes. When you buy the General Books edition of this book you get free trial access to Million-Books.com where you can select from more than a million books for free. You can also preview the book there.



Star Maps: History, Artistry, and Cartography

Star Maps: History, Artistry, and Cartography

From the reviews:pLucky me. I just received Star Maps: History, Artistry, and Cartography by Nick Kanas (Springer, 2007). This is one thorough and highly illustrated book! a ] In addition to numerous black-and-white illustrations, three sections (totaling 76 pages) reproduces star maps in color. Several appendices and a glossary round out this terrific book. If youa (TM)re interested in acquiring some of the magnificent maps Kanas describes, be sure to read Appendix A, a ~Collecting celestial maps and prints.a (TM) (Michael Bakich, Astronomy Magazine, November, 2007)pThis work will undoubtedly become a standard reference work for this study. a ] this is an extraordinary book at a very reasonable price by one of our own members who is a world class observer and a highly skilled writer. Ia (TM)m sure you will enjoy reading it. a ] Well done, Nick. Your efforts will be appreciated for many years to come. (Bill Warren, California Map Society Newsletter, Vol. 2K+7 (4), 2007)pThis California psychiatry professor has poured decades of personal fascination with old star maps into a comprehensive survey, which goes from antiquity through the 20th century. a ] More than 200 illustrations, 76 in color, are nicely presented for a book of modest a ] format. a ] An appendix contains wise advice for anyone collecting antiquarian star maps. (Roger Sinnott, Sky & Telescope, March, 2008)pTodaya (TM)s interplanetary probes and space stations make it easy to overlook that it all began by simply looking up at the sky and charting the stars. a ] As you might expect in a book on maps, the many illustrations (76 in colour) are well reproduced a ] . In the forward, Norman Thrower(UCLA) opines that this work will become a ~an important reference worka (TM) for those interested in the history of stellar cartography. I heartily agree. Ita (TM)s a thumping good read too! (Steve Ringwood, Astronomy Now, March, 2008)pDr. Kanas is the author of a wonderful book: Star Maps a ] . @7ǮzH



The Milky Way Map, Laminated

The Milky Way Map, Laminated

Explore the far reaches of the Milky Way galaxy.



Universe Map

Universe Map

Explore the stars in our known universe.



The Heavens Map, Laminated

The Heavens Map, Laminated

Chart the course of heavenly bodies.



The Ancient Mariners: Seafarers and Sea Fighters of the Mediterranean in Ancient Times

The Ancient Mariners: Seafarers and Sea Fighters of the Mediterranean in Ancient Times

No Synopsis Available



Celestial Navigation Reference Card Celestial Navigation Reference Card

Celestial Navigation Reference Card Celestial Navigation Reference Card

Celestial Navigation Reference Card Celestial Navigation Reference Card Davis Instruments Celestial Navigation Reference Card - CELESTIAL NAVIGATION REFERENCE CARD



Celestial Navigation

Celestial Navigation

Celestial Navigation



Practical Celestial Navigation

Practical Celestial Navigation

A comb-bound textbook/workbook praised by The Practical Sailor as a first-class piece of work, Susan Howell''s Practical Celestial Navigation was developed for Mystic Seaport''s navigation courses. This third edition, published by the Seaport''s Planetarium, retains the step-by-step format of the original, along with an abundance of diagrams and practice problems. Practical Celestial Navigation is recommended as a self-instruction text for beginners or for old celestial hands getting back in practice.



Celestial Navigation

Celestial Navigation

To the uninitiated, celestial navigation appears to be a somewhat frightening exercise in mathematics.




Chart A Course Ahead

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